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Last Updated: Aug 22, 2017 URL: http://libguides.warner.edu/socialwork Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

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Education

  • No Child Left Behind Act (2001)
    From Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of the Handicapped and Other Exceptional Children and Adults
    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB; PL 107–110) was signed into law by President George W. Bush on January 8, 2002. The law was designed to implement many of the education reforms proposed during the president’s first presidential campaign, though whether the changes made by the statute constitute actual improvements remains the subject of much heated debate. MORE
  • Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEIA), PL 108-446
    From Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of the Handicapped and Other Exceptional Children and Adults
    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), formerly known as the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 (EHA; PL 94–142), and most recently amended in 2004 by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA; PL 108–446), represents a 30-year national commitment, beginning with EHA, to children with disabilities . . . MORE
  • Individualized Educational Plan
    From Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of the Handicapped and Other Exceptional Children and Adults
    IEP is the acronym for the individualized educational plan that must now be written for each identified child with a disability prior to his or her placement in a special education program. MORE
  • School vouchers: Topic Page
    Government grants aimed at improving education for the children of low-income families by providing school tuition that can be used at public or private schools. MORE

Poverty

  • National School Lunch Act
    From Poverty and the Government in America: A Historical Encyclopedia
    The National School Lunch Act was passed in 1946 to ensure that poor children had some nutritious food. The law provides federal and state money to schools so they can buy food and feed schoolchildren. MORE
  • Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996
    From Poverty and the Government in America: A Historical Encyclopedia
    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) was the product of years of effort on the part of Republicans and Democrats to address problems in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program, which provided cash benefits to poor families. MORE
  • Food Stamp Program / Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
    From Poverty and the Government in America: A Historical Encyclopedia
    The food stamp program is a federal program to help low-income people buy food. While the modern food stamp program started in 1964, the program's origins date back to the New Deal of the 1930s. During 2006, 26 million people participated . . . MORE
  • Medicaid
    From Encyclopedia of Women's Health
    Medicaid was established in 1965 through the Title XIX of the Social Security Act. This federal–state program was developed to finance health care for low-income persons, specifically the categorically needy and the medically needy. MORE
  • Supplemental Security Income
    From Poverty and the Government in America: A Historical Encyclopedia
    Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a federal aid program created in 1972, for poor people who are elderly, or who are blind or have other disabilities. This replaced state-run programs for the disabled. The federal government provides a guaranteed minimum income that the states can then supplement as they wish. MORE
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